Cosplay Your Heart Out!

We had a successful turnout at our first ever Cosplay program!

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The wonderful Jen F., the Artist Librarian presented on:

  • The definition of Cosplay
  • Her Cosplay progression
  • Cosplay planning (time, budget, accuracy)
  • Creation versus Purchasing
  • Props
  • Resources
  • Local conventions Cosplayers meet

I was enraptured and impressed by our presenter. Her love of Cosplay grew from her hobby of sewing! Our library is very grateful for having a Cosplay program possible this summer and based on the positive feedback received, I would definitely be open to hosting the program again. I highly recommend having Jen present on Cosplay. She reads the crowd easily, goes into detail, answers questions, and is knowledgeable in many aspects of this niche art.

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Learning Outcomes
I feel our patrons were able to be exposed to a different pop culture niche. Cosplay has been increasingly popular in the U.S. to the point of people becoming professional Cosplayers, creating and modeling their own creations for conventions and publishers. At several conventions I’ve attended, there are panels on Cosplay that normally you can only enter with a paid ticket however our library was able to offer this informative panel for free. Attendees learned feasible ways of planning their Cosplay with the understanding that anyone can dress up! From accurate-on-the-spot renditions to crossplay to genderbending cosplay, there’s something for everyone.

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I’m itching to cosplay again. *Looks at cosplay-less closet* In due time, in due time. Following Jen’s tip, gotta plan it first!

Summer Reading 2018 – Calm Before the Storm

Summer Reading 2018 is here!

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Excited Haruhi Suzumiya via GIPHY

CAN YOU FEEL IT?

We got programs up the wazoo! This year we combined programs to be more family oriented. The following programs are being put together by our library:

  • Ani-Mazing Anime Programs: A continuation from before summer, bi-monthly anime showings with discussion. Three episodes shown and patrons can vote for the next episode.
  • Cosplay Your Heart Out: My good friend and awesome cosplayer will be showing cosplay techniques and thrifty shopping to create a cosplay based on your favorite pop culture character!
  • Darin Miyashiro and Co. Japanese Koto Performance: Local Koto musician Darin Miyashiro will be doing a Koto performance for patrons of all ages.
  • Every Body Rocks Family Talent Show: Families can sign up to sing or play musical instruments for an audience!
  • Family Craft Time: Family members (caregivers and teens/children) are able to sign up to do crafts together! The Children’s Librarian is in charge and taught me how to do the craft so to be in charge of a class out of three classes. I’m not a crafty person (my origami cranes are sad cranes) so this gives me hope.
  • Musical Movie Mondays: Every Monday at 3:30 pm, we’ll be showing a musical-themed movie. So far we have SingLa La LandPitch Perfect 3Moana, and Coco. All movies are up to PG-13.

Here’s to Summer Reading 2018!

Book Club Ideas?

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Ideas! I’ve been brainstorming ideas to hopefully build a book club for the library. Been meaning to have one but I admit, I feel like I’m trying to put all these ideas into play in so little amount of time. It’s time to sit down, focus, and breathe. Make a 5 year plan. Not a 1 year “do all the things” plan!

Continue reading Book Club Ideas?

Bullet Journal 101 for Teens

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Here’s to 2018, a new year filled with adventure and goals! I’ve been keeping a bullet journal consistently since mid-2017 and found that it has helped me a lot. It got me thinking, teens could get into this as well! When I was in school, I wasn’t keen on my school planner but with bullet journaling, I can create and mold the planner to my lifestyle. For school, I’m a few years too late on that boat. Not too late for the teens though!

Number of participants: 2
Total: 5 (parents included)

We went over what a bullet journal is and the basics of what it entails. We watched a quick video by Buzzfeed (~4 minutes) on starting a bullet journal. Understandably we did talk about how the video wasn’t geared towards teens. That’s okay though because we made it our way!

Then we showed off supplies!

 

Each pouch had:

  • 4 binder clips
  • 1 washi tape
  • 1 multi-colored pen with 6 different color ink
  • 1 black gel pen
  • 1 double-sided tape dispenser with whiteout tape on the other side
  • Each participant can choose between a grid notebook or a blank notebook (dot/lined was not available)

We went over the handout, from bullet journal basics to supplies then to steps.

 

Bullet Journal 101

First we made a key. Second we made an Index. We all made a weekly page together to try our hand at making a template. Afterwards the participants were free to brainstorm and create for their journal. Some pages that were created:

  • Favorite book genre page
  • Art page
  • Favorite sticker page

 

Overall the program was a hit with the kids and the parents. We extended the time by half an hour so the kids can create more. We had a couple books available for everyone to read through, one of which was listed in the handout.

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What I should have done:

  • Change signage to read open to 6th – 12th grade instead of 7th – 12th grade.
  • Have blank template examples ready to look at/to take home. I’ve seen some journals where they print their template out, cut and tape inside their journal.
  • Make it more teen friendly. I know I listed template ideas but let’s discuss/brainstorm ideas and ask the teens themselves what would be an essential template for them. Also mold templates for “adulting” such as expense tracker to teens, such as turning it into an allowance tracker.

I would definitely do this program again. I would move it to December so that participants can brainstorm and create their bujo prior to the new year starting. As someone who has been attempting to be organized, I found that creating a bujo has helped in both the personal and professional arena. I’m able to keep better track of my readings, errands, and thoughts that would otherwise be a pile of Post-It Notes, scribbles in my notebook, or lost in my file cabinet monster. I hope that teens will be able to use this technique to organize themselves in this rapidly changing world. Here’s to a new year, new you!

*Note: Jennifer F. of The Artist Librarian took pictures of the program but sadly they couldn’t upload correctly. I wanted to give a shoutout to her for coming in and observing! ❤️

Favorite Links – December 2017

Inspired by Teen Services Underground, today’s post will be a collection of links I found that struck my interest. For an awesome and recent example of TSU’s “Links of the Month”, feel free to click on the link to view.

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Program Ideas: Bullet Journal

Preparing for my upcoming Bullet Journal Workshop for Teens, Buzzfeed had a helpful post on ways to track your mental health in your journal. I feel this is important to know; I’ve had several teen patrons tell me that they are unable to attend programs at the library due to feeling “overloaded” at school and other activities. I feel you, I’ve been there; I’ve been keeping track of at least one happy thing that happened a day. Whether it be a good patron interaction or bringing a good lunch, it’s nice to look back at a nice thing that made my happy on that day.

A Bullet Journal idea masterpost! When I first looked it over, I couldn’t believe I didn’t think about making a tracker for watching my Netflix series, skincare routine, or reading comics. I understand, I’m behind on tracking graphic novels I’ve read (usually would put the title under a date I started/finished) but this helps. However this gave me more ideas, I’m afraid I’ll need another journal by the time it’s Summer 2018!

Regarding the Bullet Journal ideas, here is a Tumblr dedicated to studying and note-taking. I’ve used the Cornell Notes method since middle school and has stuck with me since. I went from lined to blank pages in a Moleskin journal during college and now I’m going to dot journals but always the same template. The Cornell Notes template is good when we have staff meetings or when I’m brainstorming ideas.

Graphic Novel Talk

From the Comic Book Legal Defense Fund, an article “How Comics Conquered Libraries”. A must-read when it comes to understanding how the rise of graphic novels in our libraries have made way for literacy.

Comics, the King of Libraries rings true with this Publisher’s Weekly article. There is mention of attempts to ban comics, how digital comics run through libraries, acquiring webcomics, and the continuing rise for these books. Indeed there is a growing demand for comics and with public libraries being a channel for people to access comics for free, we’ll continue to see that demand rise. Honestly I’m intrigued by the banning of books, particularly graphic novels. There is still the presumption that due to the graphic medium, the books are only for children. With suggested age ratings on the books, librarians have shields to explain to those who wish to ban graphic novels. I believe with proper guidance, graphic novels of all levels will be accepted.

I hope to make this a monthly thing, to share things I come across and to organize it all. Cheers and thanks for reading!

Conference Time! – Day 2

Welcome to the part 2 series to “Conference Time! or I Can’t Believe I Made It Through The Weekend!”

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I was beat… with knowledge.*

Time to blog! Saturday was the second and last day of the HLA conference. Their full Saturday schedule can be found here.

It’s game time. I talked story with a couple friends I hadn’t seen then ran to the first panel of the day.

Escape the Library! How to Run an Escape Room at your Library (presented by Jennifer F.)

Escape Rooms are a worldwide phenomenon, both commercially and also now in library programming. These unique, live action adventure games promote collaboration, communication, creativity, and critical thinking in a fun and exciting environment for all ages! Discover what an Escape Room is, how to plan one, and why! Learn helpful tips and suggestions for a successful Escape Room event. Q&A to follow. Especially recommended for public or school librarians.

Escape Rooms! The new thing that I see on my friend’s Instagram and Facebook feeds. I’ve seen at a couple malls but never tried it. It seemed best for groups and the cost was running high so I never got into it. However this presentation changed my thinking of a pricey activity to something that can be done in the library with a high replay value. It is possible to create your own breakout kit with materials from City Mill or Ben Franklin or purchase a kit from Breakoutedu. It was so cool to see so many themes and subjects that the Escape Rooms have, from Minecraft to history to library themes, it seems endless. There are plenty of libraries in Hawaii that have done Escape Rooms, it seems it is here to stay. Special thanks to Pearl City, Aina Haina, Kailua-Kona, and Aiea.

Next I stayed for a turbo toddler panel!

Toddler Time and Beyond: Creating Programs for Our Youngest Patrons (presented by Danielle T.)

Programs specifically designed for infants and toddlers based on the early literacy research of Every Child Ready to Read (ECRR2) are a growing trend in public libraries. Research shows that the five principles of ECRR2 (talking, singing, reading, writing, and playing) greatly increase children’s pre-reading and school readiness skills. With the library’s already hectic programming schedule, incorporating ECRR2 can seem like a daunting task. Between staffing shortages, limited budgets, and the intimidation factor of working with infants, where do you start?

This presentation will focus on the Waianae Public Library’s efforts to create sustainable, budget-friendly, long term early literacy programming that empowers caregivers to use ECRR2 at home.

Mind. Blown. Yep. I’m not a Children’s Librarian nor do I have a lot of experience in that field. Danielle went from showing numbers on toddlers and their developmental stages to transforming her Keiki area at the library. Utilizing guidelines from Ever Child Ready to Read and other sources, Danielle’s storytime skyrocketed. My list of resources will be updated as I lent my the list Danielle handed out to us to my coworker. Stay tuned for that.

Graphic Novels and You: Let’s Talk Story about GNs in your Library (presented by Hillary C. and Kelly C.*)

Graphic novels, comics, manga. Today, these are synonymous in popular culture and our library collections. Why do we keep these books in our libraries and why are they important? Nervous about understanding? Come talk story and hear me out! Graphic novels are not going to be disappearing from our libraries any time soon. A recommended booklist will be included in the presentation.

I really need to give credit to Hillary here, every time she surprises me. I brought the brochures but she brought snacks! With a packed room, some people standing, we went over the brochure with resources on where librarians can find reviews as well as understanding the suggested age range on graphic novels. Then we opened up for discussion. We had several excellent questions:

  • Are graphic novels part of the Accelerated Readers list? Librarians and educators can search “graphic novels” on arbookfinder to determine if the title has an AR record. Plenty of titles that have novel forms have been published as graphic novels and thus have been incorporated to AR. The thing is that due to certain schools having certain titles under the AR test, it is up to the student/librarian/educator to find which title has an AR test at their school. From personal experience, I would give a title to a student/parent and find out their school doesn’t have an AR test for it.
  • Should we separate graphic novels that have 13+, 16+ from each other or keep together? My suggestion to this question (it was specifically for 13+ and 16+) was to not separate by age due to how difficult it would be for patrons to find but for staff to shelve. It also shows there is a barrier preventing patrons from accessing graphic novels because it shows the library cares more about age restrictions than reading access.

Before we knew it, 50 minutes had passed and we had to end the session. In the meantime, we received our feedback where we got average to above average on the scale. If we do this again, we’ll be sure to have more than a Top Recommended list of titles but also have for Children and Adult. I still have my list of titles but need to polish it better. A new goal!

Battle of the Books: Partnering to Promote the Love of Reading (presented by Tamara K.)

Battle of the Books is a Kahuku Public and School Library-led, after school, extra-curricular program for North Shore elementary school children that makes reading social. Now in its third school year, hear how this sports-like reading event at school and district levels not only sustains but empowers Koʻolauloa area students to be successful 21st century citizens. The event is a child’s version of a quiz game show where teams of students compete for prizes to answer the most questions correctly about books from pre-selected reading lists. Additionally, details will be shared about its evolution to be more reflective of Hawaii’s keiki with its Pacific Islander book choices, its community impact as stakeholders work together to celebrate the love of literature, and the importance of working with many partners to make the long-term endeavor manageable for all.

Amazing. I had heard about the juggernaut known as “Battle of the Books” but had not seen in action. Tamara first showed us the demographic and schools in the Kahuku area. From there it was a matter of gaining community interest as well as backing from the principals of the schools. When it was time to come together… Well you’ll have to see for yourself because it was amazing what everyone had done.

Ko’olauloa Battle of the Books Regional Competition Ep. 1

Ko’olauloa Battle of the Books Regional Competition Ep. 2

More information at the Hawaii State Public Library System website.

Needless to say, this last day was filled with nerves but exhaustion in attending panels for a majority of the day as well as sitting for the final keynote speaker, Rebekkah Smith Aldrich of the Mid-Hudson Library System and of Sustainablelibraries.org!

*You’re still my fave Yamcha!

**Ayyy that’s me!

 

 

Movie Programs

Movies! We all love them! Especially when they’re free!

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The library I work at has a movie license through Movie Licensing USA, which has a nifty search feature that shows what movies can be shown at X location.

Choosing the movie can be difficult. From experience I’ve found that screening movies that have just released get more people in the library program than movies that have been out for a few years. Also due to the rising costs of movie tickets and large amount of movies being shown at a time, a free screening at the library doesn’t sound that bad.

Promoting is essential. Get that promotion out there! Plan the dates around school breaks or after school. Screen the movie around a special date. In July of this year, I screen Jaws (PG-13) during Shark Week! Surprisingly a handful of people were there but because they know that hey, you’re showing a free movie and it’s around this occasion, maybe you’ll do it again next year!

Two movies that surprised me in having a large crowd, many children, were Iron Man (PG-13) and Captain America: Civil War (PG-13). Parents/caregivers were present but it struck me interested that children, some as young as 6 were glued to the movies without making a sound. Understandably, both movies are part of Marvel which is owned by Disney. There are also children books and toys with these same characters. Are kids growing up fast or is the understanding that “this is a movie” with their favorite characters has reached its zenith?

Keep on going~