Conference Time! – Day 2

Welcome to the part 2 series to “Conference Time! or I Can’t Believe I Made It Through The Weekend!”

yamcha
I was beat… with knowledge.*

Time to blog! Saturday was the second and last day of the HLA conference. Their full Saturday schedule can be found here.

It’s game time. I talked story with a couple friends I hadn’t seen then ran to the first panel of the day.

Escape the Library! How to Run an Escape Room at your Library (presented by Jennifer F.)

Escape Rooms are a worldwide phenomenon, both commercially and also now in library programming. These unique, live action adventure games promote collaboration, communication, creativity, and critical thinking in a fun and exciting environment for all ages! Discover what an Escape Room is, how to plan one, and why! Learn helpful tips and suggestions for a successful Escape Room event. Q&A to follow. Especially recommended for public or school librarians.

Escape Rooms! The new thing that I see on my friend’s Instagram and Facebook feeds. I’ve seen at a couple malls but never tried it. It seemed best for groups and the cost was running high so I never got into it. However this presentation changed my thinking of a pricey activity to something that can be done in the library with a high replay value. It is possible to create your own breakout kit with materials from City Mill or Ben Franklin or purchase a kit from Breakoutedu. It was so cool to see so many themes and subjects that the Escape Rooms have, from Minecraft to history to library themes, it seems endless. There are plenty of libraries in Hawaii that have done Escape Rooms, it seems it is here to stay. Special thanks to Pearl City, Aina Haina, Kailua-Kona, and Aiea.

Next I stayed for a turbo toddler panel!

Toddler Time and Beyond: Creating Programs for Our Youngest Patrons (presented by Danielle T.)

Programs specifically designed for infants and toddlers based on the early literacy research of Every Child Ready to Read (ECRR2) are a growing trend in public libraries. Research shows that the five principles of ECRR2 (talking, singing, reading, writing, and playing) greatly increase children’s pre-reading and school readiness skills. With the library’s already hectic programming schedule, incorporating ECRR2 can seem like a daunting task. Between staffing shortages, limited budgets, and the intimidation factor of working with infants, where do you start?

This presentation will focus on the Waianae Public Library’s efforts to create sustainable, budget-friendly, long term early literacy programming that empowers caregivers to use ECRR2 at home.

Mind. Blown. Yep. I’m not a Children’s Librarian nor do I have a lot of experience in that field. Danielle went from showing numbers on toddlers and their developmental stages to transforming her Keiki area at the library. Utilizing guidelines from Ever Child Ready to Read and other sources, Danielle’s storytime skyrocketed. My list of resources will be updated as I lent my the list Danielle handed out to us to my coworker. Stay tuned for that.

Graphic Novels and You: Let’s Talk Story about GNs in your Library (presented by Hillary C. and Kelly C.*)

Graphic novels, comics, manga. Today, these are synonymous in popular culture and our library collections. Why do we keep these books in our libraries and why are they important? Nervous about understanding? Come talk story and hear me out! Graphic novels are not going to be disappearing from our libraries any time soon. A recommended booklist will be included in the presentation.

I really need to give credit to Hillary here, every time she surprises me. I brought the brochures but she brought snacks! With a packed room, some people standing, we went over the brochure with resources on where librarians can find reviews as well as understanding the suggested age range on graphic novels. Then we opened up for discussion. We had several excellent questions:

  • Are graphic novels part of the Accelerated Readers list? Librarians and educators can search “graphic novels” on arbookfinder to determine if the title has an AR record. Plenty of titles that have novel forms have been published as graphic novels and thus have been incorporated to AR. The thing is that due to certain schools having certain titles under the AR test, it is up to the student/librarian/educator to find which title has an AR test at their school. From personal experience, I would give a title to a student/parent and find out their school doesn’t have an AR test for it.
  • Should we separate graphic novels that have 13+, 16+ from each other or keep together? My suggestion to this question (it was specifically for 13+ and 16+) was to not separate by age due to how difficult it would be for patrons to find but for staff to shelve. It also shows there is a barrier preventing patrons from accessing graphic novels because it shows the library cares more about age restrictions than reading access.

Before we knew it, 50 minutes had passed and we had to end the session. In the meantime, we received our feedback where we got average to above average on the scale. If we do this again, we’ll be sure to have more than a Top Recommended list of titles but also have for Children and Adult. I still have my list of titles but need to polish it better. A new goal!

Battle of the Books: Partnering to Promote the Love of Reading (presented by Tamara K.)

Battle of the Books is a Kahuku Public and School Library-led, after school, extra-curricular program for North Shore elementary school children that makes reading social. Now in its third school year, hear how this sports-like reading event at school and district levels not only sustains but empowers Koʻolauloa area students to be successful 21st century citizens. The event is a child’s version of a quiz game show where teams of students compete for prizes to answer the most questions correctly about books from pre-selected reading lists. Additionally, details will be shared about its evolution to be more reflective of Hawaii’s keiki with its Pacific Islander book choices, its community impact as stakeholders work together to celebrate the love of literature, and the importance of working with many partners to make the long-term endeavor manageable for all.

Amazing. I had heard about the juggernaut known as “Battle of the Books” but had not seen in action. Tamara first showed us the demographic and schools in the Kahuku area. From there it was a matter of gaining community interest as well as backing from the principals of the schools. When it was time to come together… Well you’ll have to see for yourself because it was amazing what everyone had done.

Ko’olauloa Battle of the Books Regional Competition Ep. 1

Ko’olauloa Battle of the Books Regional Competition Ep. 2

More information at the Hawaii State Public Library System website.

Needless to say, this last day was filled with nerves but exhaustion in attending panels for a majority of the day as well as sitting for the final keynote speaker, Rebekkah Smith Aldrich of the Mid-Hudson Library System and of Sustainablelibraries.org!

*You’re still my fave Yamcha!

**Ayyy that’s me!

 

 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s